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one shot to protect them from the virus. tracie potts tells us about what they found so far. >> reporter: ely results from pediatric trials of the h1n1 flu vaccine show most children 10 and older had a robust immune response to the low dose of the vaccine. >> which tells us that this vaccine is acting very similarly to what the seasonal flu vaccine acts like in children. >> reporter: that means likely just one shot or nasal spray for kids 10 and older, but probably two for those under 10. >> they need a little extra, a little nudge to the immune system to respond. >> reporter: scientists won't know for sure until more results come in in a few weeks but they urge parents, once a vaccine is available, don't delay. >> give them one and then keep your eye on things inform. you may need to bring them back. >> reporter: some doctors say they're still waiting on both the h1n1 and the seasonal flu vaccine. >> we're hoping we get both. >> reporter: that's a good idea with the shot, not the live nasal spray. the cdc says getting both the shot and the nasal mist could make one or both
, and a fiedd!in rural(pdnnsylvania. >> tracie potts takes a look at today's events and how president obama and the victims' families want the state remembered. >> from downtownçç houston to classrooms in kansas, from a church in florida to this firehouse in las vegas. >>çó watching this tower collapsed, and thinking -- iç s just inç shock. >> today, america remembered the nearly 3000 people who died on september 11. >> yolanda. >>ç çthe pain is still wroughn new york, where the memorial is still under construction -- the pain is still raw. ç>>ç the pain can still be so sharp. >> two planes hit, two towers hit, and every name was read here and in shanksville, pa.,ç took on terrorists reportedly bound for the white house. >> we can never truly grasp of the emotions that must've gone through the hearts and mindsç f passengers andç crew as they realized the mortal danger they were in. >> at the white house today, and moment of silence before president obama laid a wreath on a ringçç -- a moment of silene before president obama laid a wreath. >> we will do everything
. from the pentagon to pennsylvania to new york city, people gathered today to remember. tracie potts has our report. >> coast guard gun boats confronting a vessel in a short distance from the president and the anniversary of 9/11 it sounded like a big story. >> no shots were fired. there was no suspect vessel. >> the coast guard said it was just a routine drill but quickly escalated into an extraordinary misunderstanding. >> that is clearly not the report we were looking for. that's the report of the exercises by the coast guard that had many people concerned today while some of the 9/11 ceremonies were taking place. we'll try to get tracie potts' story later in our broadcast. >>> many americans stationed around the world in the military or foreign service also marked this day with memorial services. troops in afghanistan paused to salute the people who were killed during the terrorist attacks, and those who died since then. more than 800 americans have been killed in afghanistan since the u.s. invasion there in 2001. in okinawa in japan, soldiers serving there fought already in iraq and
for your heart. >> and i'm tracie potts in washington with the latest on the h1n1 virus and when the first doses of that vaccine will be ready. that story next. >> first a live picture outside. john has your 11 news forecast after the break. (announcer) itchy dry scalp? finally there's new selsun blue itchy dry scalp. strong itch fighters plus five moisturizers stop the itch, leave hair healthy. selsun blue. >> skies are clear this morning. it is nice out there. temperatures around 60 or so. overnight, just a few hours ago, a cool front slipped through the area. mostly dry. as you can see on radar, and i have three hours of radar images arkifed here, and i'm rolling through them now, you can see a little flash of green rolling north and south on the eastern shore. ahead of that front a nue few showers cropped up. i hesitate to call them showers, but that was a frontal passage. now it is onto the south over the virginia capes. and we've cleared out and it is a beautiful morning this morning. let's take a look at it on our skycam view. at bwi marshall 61. with these temperatures down close t
, but will not taxing sugary drinks help pay for the problem? tracy potts says -- talks about the idea. >> a group of doctors, nutritionists, and economists say a tax could raise almost $15 billion a year for health programs. >> it is only fair that the people consuming these beverages help share the cost of the diseases they are putting upon themselves. >> are these drinks really to blame for medical problems? some studies say yes, others say no. >> there have not been the randomized studies to show that cutting these out makes a huge difference. >> take arkansas and west virginia for example. they have shorter taxes and the highest obesity rates in the country. >> the sale of regular soft drinks have been going down over the last few years. >> experts pushing that tax believe it will cut consumption by 8%, just like cigarette taxes lead to fewer smokers. it is an incentive for producers to cut out the sugar. >> if they cut out sugar in those beverages, it would be wonderful. that would be a victory. >> the beverage industry insists there is already plenty of choices. >> here is something for pet
finance committee released its version for overhauling the system. tracy potts has more. >> reporter: reaching out to republicans today the white house announced grants for states to boost patient safety and reduce doctors' mal practice insurance. >> gting to a point where if an error occurs, there is just and rapid compensation and we move forward. >> reporter: appealing to democrats, president obama took his case for public health insurance to the university of maryland today. >> we've got public universities and private universities. nobody says we are taking over private colleges. what we are doing is giving students a choice. >> reporter: it's a choice house democrats insist on including. >> a public option will be in the bill that passes the house of representatives. >> reporter: in the senate, the debate is ove whether it's fair for everyone to buy insurance and a tax on expensive health plans might affect working families. >> they can't be paying an unfair chunk of that total income to health care. >> reporter: the congressional budget office says senate finance chair max bau
center, the pentagon, and that field in rural pennsylvania. >> and tracie potts with a story on how 9-11 victims' families want the day remembered. >> watching that tower collapse and thinking -- i was just in shock. >> today america remembered the nearly 3,000 people who died on september 11. >> yolanda reynado. >> sean booker. >> a memorial is still under construction. >> it feels like everything just happened yesterday. the pain can still be so sharp. >> two planes hit. two towers collapsed. and every victims -- victim's name was read. 40 passengers and crew took on terrorists reportedly bound for the white house. >> we can never truly grasp the emotions that must have gone through the hearts and minds of the passengers and crew as they realized the mortal danger they were in. >> at the white house today, a moment of silence before president obama laid a wreath honoring the victims at the pentagon, promising to fight terror. >> mindful that the work of protecting america is never finished, we will do everything in our power to keep america safe. >> then he went to work on what wil
are straight ahead. >> a busy week ahead for the president. hi, i'm tracie potts in washington. up next, we'll talk about health, education, and jobs this labor day. [captioning made possible by constellation energy] >> good morning, everyone. i'm lisa robinson in for mindy. >> and i'm stan stovall. >> the big story in just a moment, but first, let's check in with sandra shaw for the day's forecast. >> we had such awesome weather all wed
health reform. i'm tracy potts in washington, everyone's wondering what the president will say when he comes here to capitol hill. my report next. >> if you're headed out this >> if you're headed out this morning in cockeysville we'll ♪ [ woman ] ♪ early light breaks through ♪ music and dance calling you ♪ just need that@ mountain grown lift ♪ ♪ before you share your gift ♪ ♪ now there's rhythm and sound ♪ making their hearts pound ♪ the best part of wakin' up... ♪ ♪ is folgers in your cup [captioning made possible by conste
and should not be included in the health reform plan. tracy potts has more. >> back when president obama will lay out his plan for health reform. >> at the end of the day what the president would like us to do becomes the most unlessal. >> it is going to be an awful lot of screaming and hollering before we get there. but i believe we're going to get there. >> lawmakers, patience and doctors all looking for specifics. >> medicare payments, reform must take place in this country, physicians who have predominantly medicare practices are having trouble keeping their lights on. >> medicare is one of the big issues doctors say they don't earn enough to cover their costs and patients worry about losing coverage. >> i think it's a matter of helping people understand that providing coverage or other people will not reduce the coverage you have. >> and out in those town halls they that continue across america one driving issue is taxpayer money how much more will the government have to sfoned cover 46 million americans. >> every time we start a new program like social security or whatever it is, w
. tracie potts has more. >> reporter: after a briefing on the h 1n 1 virus president obama offered this advice. skipping your swine flu shot is not a good idea. >> this program will be completely voluntary, but it will be strongly recommended. >> reporter: vaccine won't be ready until mid october. that first batch won't be enough for everyone. states don't seem worried. >> they'll been an opportunity for every virginian to have access to the vaccine. >> reporter: until then, experts insist soap and water is your best defense. school children, even public officials are being taught how to wash their hands. >> these guys corrected me quickly when i didn't put enough soap on, i didn't wash my hands long enough. >> reporter: all over the country, educators insist classes will stay open. >> if your child comes to school ill, we will send them home. but school closure is not on the agenda right now. >> reporter: evidence shows young adult ts, teens and children are a prime target. >> not even 2 yet, so it scares me. >> reporter: this indianapolis couple believes they gave the h1n1 virus
before you may be in the middle of a crisis. tracie potts has the latest from capitol hill. >> reporter: the government's put out a new guide book on h1n1 specifically targeting smaller businesses with fewer people. their biggest challenge is how to keep things running when employees are out sick like at doctor's offices. >> one absent nurse or receptionist can all but cripple the office. >> identify critical employees who need to have some backup or crosstrain some others to take their place if they have to be gone. >> reporter: the wind vail group make sure all of their workers can log in remotely. >> if the child is sick or if the child's school is closed for any kind of flu outbreak they can just as easy work from home interview and a recent harvard study found most small businesses are not prepared. 7 in 10 surveyed said they'd suffer severe problems. a vaccine is on the way, but with the virus already spreading, will a mid-october shot be too late? >> building up population immunity and priming people is extremely important even if we're a little late for the very first crest of t
youngsters will need just one shot to protect them from the virus, while others will need two. tracie potts has the latest. >> reporter: early results from pediatric trials of the h1n1 flu vaccine show most children, 10 and older had a robust immune response to the low dose of the vaccine. >> which tells us that this vaccine is acting very similarly to what the seasonal flu vaccine acts like in children. >> reporter: that means likely just one shot or nasal spray for kids 10 and older, but probably two for those under 10. >> they need a little extra, little nudge to the immune system to respond. >> reporter: scientists won't know for sure until more results come in in a few week bus they urge parents, once vaccine is available, don't delay. >> give them one and then keep your eye on the information. you may need to bring them back. >> reporter: some doctors say they're still waiting on both the h1n1 and the seasonal flu vaccine. >> we're hoping they'll be able to get both. >> reporter: that's the good idea with the shots. the cdc says getting flu myth for the regular flu and the spray on th
be at a clinic or doctor's office near you. tracie potts is on capitol hill with the latest. >> reporter: the cdc says nearly 3.5 million doses of the h1n1 vaccine will be ready the first week of october. it will be the nasal spray. because the spray contain as live virus, pregnant women can't get it even though they are high risk. >> hopefully i'll be able to get it before i deliver the baby. >> reporter: they started testing pregnant women with the injectable vaccine. >> pregnant women may respond differently by side effects or how much immune response they have. >> reporter: despite recommendations to put children, young adults and health care workers first, the cdc says it's up to each state. >> and there is a balance there, recognizing there is demand, there is ability to minister it and we have disease. >> reporter: the world health organization warns production is falling short. u.s. officials admit getting the vaccine out to be slow at first. >> there is no magic to this. this is a huge logistical process. there is no sudden appearance of the vaccine. >> reporter: the viruses spreading tw
. it looks like some youngsters will need just one dose. others may need two. tracie potts has details. >> reporter: early results from pediatric trials of the h1n1 flu vaccine show most children, 10 and older had a robust immune response to the low dose of the vaccine. >> which tells us that this vaccine is acting very similarly to what the seasonal flu vaccine acts like in children. >> reporter: that means likely, just one shot or nasal spray for kids 10 and older, but probably two for those under 10. >> they need a little extra, little nudge to the immune system to respond. >> reporter: scientists won't know for sure until more rests come in in a few weeks but they urge parents, once vaccine is available, don't delay. >> give them one and then keep your eye on the information. you may need to bring them back. >> reporter: some doctors say they're still waiting on both the h1n1 and the seasonal flu vaccine. >> we're hoping they'll be able to get both. >> reporter: that's the good idea with the shots. the cdc says getting flu mist for the regular flu and the spray on the h1n1 on the s
he will detail what he wants in health care legislation. tracie potts reports from capitol hill. >> reporter: around the country lawmakers and americans want to know where is that obama audacity on health reform. >> it is time that the president became audacious. >> got to be the most significant bill in his four years or eight years. why wouldn't he want his name on it. >> reporter: criticism that president obama hasn't clearly outlined what he wants prompted him to address a joint session of congress next wednesday to lay out his plan. negative comments from two key republicans working on a compromise reportedly prompted this speech. >> we can't afford to wait any longer for health care with a real public health insurance option. >> reporter: that public option, government health insurance, is a big hangup. republicans are flat out against it. >> whether the government or the employer basically provides it you don't have any skin in the game. >> reporter: democrats argue the gop offered no alternative. >> if you have a better way of doing it, put it on the table. >> reporter:
be overturned. tracy potts has our report. >> she is steeped in controversy, steeped in sleaze. >> reporter: the nonprofit group citizens united wanted to offer this hillary clinton documentary as video on demand during the 2008 presidential campaign, but the government blocked it, claiming the show violates federal campaign finance laws that prohibit corporations from runng political attack ads against candidates shortly before elections. the group paid for the program with corporate donations. today the supreme court heard arguments that this is a first amendment issue. >> a ban on hillary the movie today would mean a ban on hillary the book tomorrow. >> reporter: the senators who created that law say overturning it would allow big companies too much influence in elections. >> their corporate treasuries would be opened up to dtroy the political process. this is a very bizarre time. >> reporter: in court today the film maker argued most corporations bound by this law are really small businesses. >> government can't license speech based upon a person's bank account. >> reporter: in rare aud
on all the events of this eighth anniversary of the september 11 attacks, beginning with tracie potts. >> reporter: at ground zero, new yorkers paused four times. one for each moment the planes hit. one for each moment the towers fell. >> in our joys and in our sorrows, we know we belong to one another. >> reporter: for more than three hours they read the names of each victim, nearly 3,000 in all. grace's husband caesar died in the first tower. >> eight years passed, but sometimes it feels like everything happened yesterday, the pain can still be so sharp. >> reporter: new york is remembering 9/11 and looking ahead, joining president obama's call to make this a national day of service. >> we will safe guard the memories of those who died by rekindling the spirit of service that lit our city with hope. >> reporter: in washington, the president and first lady observed a moment of silence at the white house before joining families in driving rain to honored 1 4 victims killed at the pentagon. mr. obama promised america won't give up on finding their attackers. >> in defense of our nation
. people in the poll said that they were concerned about the possibility of side effects. tracie potts reports. >> reporter: hospitals are already pleading for the new flu virus. the university of michigan found only 40% of parents plan to give the vaccine to their children. the concern, serious side effects. >> there's absolutely no way a vaccine could cause the process that results in a heart attack. >> reporter: heart attacks, strokes, seizures, sudden infant death syndrome, miscarriages or the flu itself. the centers for disease control says there's no evidence the vaccine can cause any of these problems. the doctors fear misinformation may keep high-risk patients away. >> it's so important for patients who know that they have a heart problem to get the vaccine so that if they get the flu it will be a milder case. >> reporter: in 1976 flu shots were pulled after thousands of people contracted the paralyzing syndrome. >> no reasonight now to expect that, but we want to be ready if the unexpected occurs. >> reporter: the cdc is planning an aggressive monitoring program to prepare for
vinci code." as tracy potts reports, you don't have to be a fan of "the da vinci code." >> this is the temple room blocks from the white house. it's here where dan brown's new mystery, "the lost symbol" begins. the building usually gets 5,000 visitors a year. with all the atttion from brown's book, they are bracing for more. thinking about replacing the carpet, hiring more guards, maybe even charging for tours. >> we don't know how to prepare for this. >> when brown features this world scottish church "the da vinci code" tourists more than quadrupled. >> they join a church, they look around, they see what a very, very beautiful and historic place it is. oh, and by the way, they look at the tomb. >> the masons have been connected to washington for hundreds of years. george washington and teddy roosevelt for masons. they laid the corner stone for the white house and capitol. brown's book combines landmarks, the botanical gardens, the masonic temple. >> not so secret. >> it's probably more accurately to describe us as a society with secrets. we suddenly have had a spotlig
for his latest novel. it's titled "the lost symbol." it hit bookstores today. tracie potts has our report. >> reporter: this is the temple room where the free mason supreme council meets in washington just blocks from the white house. it's here th dan brown's new mystery, "the lost symbol "sncht begins. >> it's very exciting and scary. >> reporter: the building usually gets 5,000 visitors a year. now with all the attention from brown's book they are bracing for more. thinking about repalatial the carpet, hiring more guards and maybe charging for towers. >> we don't know how to prepare for this. >> reporter: when brown featured this church in "the da vinci code," tourists quadrupled. >> they enjoyed the church, they lookround and see what a very, very beautiful and historic place it is. oh, and by the way, they look at the tomb. >> reporter: the masons have been connected to washington hundreds of years. orge what and teddy roosevelt were masons. mason laid the corner stone for the white house and capitol. the book combines landmarks, library of congress, botanical gardens and masonic temp
to help pay for the health problems they may cause. tracy potts reports. >> reporter: a group of doctors, nutritionists and economists says a penny an ounce tax on sugary drinks could raise almost $15 billion a year for health programs. >> it's only fair that people consuming these beverages help share the cost of the diseases they are putting upon themselves. >> reporter: but are these sugar-sweetened beverages really to blame for diabetes, heart disease, obesity? some studies say yes, others say no. an author of the popular youth health guide says we need a definite answer. >> there have not been the randomized studies to show and that have shown definitively that cutting these out makes a huge difference. >> reporter: take arkansas and west virginia, for example. the beverage industry says they have sugar taxes and some of the highest obesity rates in the country. >> the sale of regular soft drinks has been going down over the last ten years, 9%. at the same time the obesity rate has been rising. >> reporter: experts pushing the sugar tax believe it will cut consumption by 8%. it woul
this week. tracie potts has more on the story from washington. >> president obama joins labor leaders today to welcome the new head of the afl-cio and name a new advisor for manufacturing. this labor day, the nation's jobless rate is 9.7%, and republicans argue the health reform plan mr. obama outlined wednesday requiring everyone to buy insurance could cost millions more jobs. >> it's complicated, it's convoluted, and it's quite simply not going to work. it's time to press the reset button. >> on "meet the press," a top white house advisor was asked if mr. obama will compromise on the controversial public option government insurance. >> do you believe this is a good tool? now, it shouldn't define the whole healthcare debate, however. >> but before that, the president is set to address the nation's schoolchildren tuesday in a speech that has rattled some parents who say they'll keep their kids home fearing this 18-minute speech may be partisan. the secretary of education says the president will simply encourage students to stay in school. >> the real question i have is why has it been 18 ye
ahead before they wind up in the middle a crisis. tracie potts has more on this from capitol hill. >> reporter: the government's put out a new guide book on h1n1, specifically targeting small businesses with fewer people, their biggest challenge is how to keep things running when employees are out sick like at doctor's offices. >> one absent nurse or receptionist can all but cripple the office's ability to function. >> reporter: the government's urging them to plan ahead. >> identify critical employees who need to have some backup or cross train some others to take their place if they have to be gone. >> reporter: the wind vail group make sure all of their workers can log in remotery. >> if the child is sick, they can easily work from home. >> reporter: but a recent harvard study found most small businesses are not prepared. six in 10 surveyed said they'd experienced severe operational problems if half of their staff was out for two weeks with the flu. a vaccine is on the way but with the virus already spreading will a mid-october shot be too late? >> building up population immuni
's on the table right now won't work. tracie potts is on capitol hill with the latest on all of this. >> reporter: hi there. the president today comparing choices in education to choices in health care. something that he's trying to get the law makers here on capitol hill to agree to, but based on the meetings we saw this afternoon and comments after those meetings, it looks like they're still pretty far apart.
and head of the government's team on auto bailouts. from washington, i'm tracie potts, wbal-tv 11 news. >> police in louisiana are trying to determine the motive behind a triple murder and suicide. saturday a man killed his wife, his son, and 2-year-old grandson before killing himself. investigators say the shootings appeared to stem from an ongoing dispute between 50-year-old dennis carter sr. and his wife. carter also shot his daughter-in-law, who jumped out of a window to try to save her 2-year-old and her unborn child. unfortunately, the toddler died. her baby was born yesterday about three months premature, but in good health. >> one person is dead and several others injured after a prisoner van plunged off an interstate in mississippi. the van was carrying 12 people at the time when it drove off an interstate in hattiesburg. the driver was pronounced dead at the scene. a guard and two prisoners were critically injured. nine others were treated at a hospital. their conditions are unknown. all 12 people had to be cut from the wreckage. a crack in a california bridge may create quit
for the president. hi, i'm tracie potts in washington. up next, we'll talk about health, education, and
doses were shipped in the last week. they now have to be redistributed all across the country. as tracy potts explains, there is growing concern about getting the vaccine. >> 14-year-old chloe lindsay died from the h1n1 virus. her mother is urging parents to get her children vaccinated. >> i cannot fathom that this can happen to me. i don't want it to happen to anybody else. >> the university of michigan reports only four out of 10 parents plan to vaccinate their children. even health care workers are concerned. some hospitals are singling out employees who do not get the vaccine. >> i think you need to be able to step up to the plate. >> in new york, employees protested today. they are worried about 1976 when thousands were stricken with a paralyzing disease after taking the flu vaccine. >> there is concern about whether all of this is necessary. >> no corners have been cut in this process. >> we have safety data from decades of experience with seasonal vaccines that are made in the same manner. >> one school district in texas closed after 900 students got sick. >> coughing, headaches,
the war began. tracie potts is live on capitol hill with more on these disturbing new numbers. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, everyone. that also adds to the deadliest year so far in this war. in the past eight years, this has been the worst year, and now the top u.s. commander in afghanistan is asking the pentagon for more help. >> our goal is clear. to disrupt, dismantle and defeat al qaeda and their extremist allies. >> reporter: but the enemy's getting smarter and more americans are dying. at least 47 troops killed in august alone, the deadliest month since the war began eight years ago. >> the fact that we're going into areas where taliban have basically been unchallenged for a number of years means that our casualties are going to be higher. >> reporter: despite the success of democratic elections last month, the military says taliban forces are building bigger bombs. ied attacks are up 114% in the last year. in a report still making its way through the pentagon, the top u.s. commander in afghanistan reportedly is asking for a new strategy and more troops. >> clearly
well under way. tracie potts, nbc news washington. >> of the 26 states reporting widespread activity, 99% of those cases have been confirmed as h1n1 virus. meanwhile, the flu has sit down an entire school district near houston, texas. all eight campuses will remain closed until thursday. school officials there say 15% of the students were absent yesterday so are 10% of the teachers are sick. health officials have determined that texas is one of the 26 states where flu activity is widespread, and they say more than half the cases are swine flu. >>> not just schools, but area businesses, too, are concerned about how the pandemic will affect them. this morning the greater washington brd of trade sponsored a seminar to discuss the impact swine flu may have in our region. about 25% of board members showed up for the seminar to get advice. the message delivered today, businesses need a plan. >> there's little predictable about this when it relates -- the 20% perhaps in your office may be one department at a time or maybe 20% of that department, 20% of another department and right on down t
will be spent on tv ads about health reform. i'm tracy potts, wbal-tv 11 news. >> bring on the chiefs, that's what the baltimore ravens have to say this morning after completeing a perfect and more importantly relatively healthy preseason. not much of a chance of injury for starters as most were kept out but john beck, third string quarterback turned in an impressive performance. more coming up later. that brings us to our water cooler question of the day how do you think the ravens will do this year? email us your response to watercooler@wbaltv.com. >> they should do well. they should. 6:08, 63 degrees on tv hill. coming up this morning's financial news. >> and what doing vest gators uncover as they look for the cause of the score whiching fires in southern california. >> and we'll tell you what model cars are most popular at the chop shops in this morning's "consumer alert." >> your weekend forecast. labor day details coming up. >> and the closures along u.s. 50 continue to be there so we will update you on when police say it will clear. >> an a very good morning to you. 70 degrees downto
. that's the latest from capitol hill tonight. i'm tracie potts, news4 washington. >> thank you. >>> thousands of university of maryland students anticipated the president's arrival today. they were up early. students started to form a line four hours before the doors opened at the comcast p center. this was mr. obama's third trip to their campus. for many it was their first time hearing his message in person. >> i feel like his health program is going to help everybody. i'm desperate to listen to him. >> to protestors who disagree with the health care plan held peaceful demonstrations. >> another person hit by the metro train today. this time it was a teenager. the train hit the teenager at the columbia heights stop this afternoon. derrick ward is in the area with more. >> reporter:e are learning a bit more. it happened about 1:55 this afternoon. we want to show you some video immediately after the incident. paramedics taking the victim out of the station. he was being resuscitated frantically. we understand he did succumb to his wounds and his injuries. we were told this man,
afford. tracie potts, news4. >> the sate could start debating the plan next week. republicans are worried democrats may try to shorten debate to rush the legislation through. >>> on the hill, a bill is moving through the house that could help more than a million jobless americans. this measure would provide an additional 13 weeks of unemployment benefits. the extension would cover people whose benefits would run out a the end of this month. for those who live in states where the unemployment rate is at least 8.5%, d.c. and about 25 states fall into that category. a vote on the bill could happen either later today or tomorrow. >>> the federal deposit insurance corporation or fdic guarantees the safety of deposits in member banks up to $250,000 of a depositivor's account would be reimbursed if the bank should go under. bu the fdic seized 94 banks this year and funds are running short. "new york times" said the agency is considering a plan to borrow from the nation's banks. they have a $100 billion line of credit with the treasury department, but regulators are reluctant to borrow from tax p
it good judgment. tracie potts, nbc news, washington. >>> the virus is widespread, but it is a mild or moderate strain. in fact, the cdc says the number of people hospitalized so far is fewer than in a normal flu season. >>> coming up tonight, we'll tell you about changes for people who tailgate at the redskins' gape >>> good evening. bob ryan, storm center 4. still warm. 76 degrees in leesburg. we'll see more cool, dry air coming in after a cool start tomorrow. temperatures will be into the 70s. there will be a brisk, northeasterly wind. there is a bit of advisory, small craft advisory out for sailors. great sailing weather. coastal flooding minimal on the west part of the bay. st. constantine having a great festival up there on 16th street and the blumont fair. great weekend. back to you. >>> howard university is receiving an historic grant to help preserve the school's history. today federal officials, including secretary of the interior ken salazar, joined universitied administers to announce the grant made possible by the american recovery act. 20 black colleges are getting fed
. >> president obama is using labor day to spend time talking about jobs. tracie potts now has that story. >> reporter: president obama joins labor leaders today to welcome the new head of the afl/cio and name a new adviser for manufacturing. this labor day, the nation's jobless rate is 9.7% and republicans argue the health reform plan mr. obama outlines wednesday, requiring everyone to buy insurance, can cost millions more jobs. >> it's complicated. it's convoluted. and it's quite simply not going to work. it's time to press the reset button. >> reporter: on "meet the press," a top white house adviser was asked if mr. obama will compromise on the controversial public option, government insurance. >> he believes the public option is a good tool. now it shouldn't define the whole health care debate, however. >> reporter: but before that, the president's set to address the nation's school children tuesday in a speech that has rattled some parents who say they'll keep their kids home fearing this 18-minute speech may be partisan. the cretary of education says the president will simply encour
legislation. tracie potts joins us live from capitol hill and has more for us now. >> reporter: good morning, everyone. as we have seen democrats and republicans in disagreement here on the hillnd angry town halls all over the country, democrats and republicans, quite frankly, have been asking for leadership on this issue, and now it looks like we may begin to see some of that this fall as the president comes here to the hill to lay out specifics on what he wants in his health care plan. health reform. >> it is time that the president became audacious. >> probably going to be the most significant bill in his four years or eight years. why wouldn't he want his name on it? >> reporter: criticism that president obama hasn't clearly outlined what he wants has prompted him to address a joint session of congress next wednesday to lay out his plan. negative comments from two key republicans working on a compromise reportedly prompted this speech. >> we can't afford to wait any longer for health care with the real public health insurance option. >> reporter: that public option, government health ins
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